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  #11  
Old 01-26-2012, 03:05 PM
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David,

Do you think cleaning and adjusting the gap on the High Frequency points would help? I think this only happens on starting.
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Old 01-26-2012, 03:40 PM
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Blow it out with air first J. As Per manual instructions.

Disassembling the machine is a last resort.

A "tiny arc" of a welder is a miniature transformer generating a broadband RF wave. Luckily the frequency of the rf does not allow it to travel very far. The spiking voltages are why there are saftey gaps in lots of old welders that do not have hi-freq starting.. otherwise the voltage may rise to the point of "piercing" the varnish on the windings and allowing short circuits to ensue burning the welder transformer out.
On Power plant generators, after rewinding, a "thumper" leakage tester can be "turned" up so high it destroys the winding insulation during testing.

A more common megg-ohm meter does a similar thing, pumping a voltage into a electrical device and checking for leakage beyond the insulation, windings or... it normally only cranks 600 or 1000 volts in thou.

DO not meg-ohm test a welder such as ours.. it will fry the control boards.

I need to open my synchrowave up and see why the stick welder function quit working. Mine is a older one as big as a truck engine.
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Old 01-26-2012, 04:26 PM
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I have a Miller 180 syncrowave as well, and have taken a couple jolts up one arm, through the shoulders and down the other arm. Have no idea and it doesn't feel very good, and a lot of nasty words come out of my mouth, and I have to stop and take a break and make sure I still have all my faculties. I used to weld without gloves and maybe that's why I got the shock. I finally got used to holding the tiny filler rod with gloves on. Hoping it doesn't ever happen again, but I have no idea why I got shocked in the first place, other than maybe being barehanded.
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  #14  
Old 01-26-2012, 05:06 PM
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Yeah, I've welded more bare-knuckled than with gloves.. and yes.. lighting the tig torch on the filler rod you are "holding" is quite stimulating.

J.. page 29 of the manual, says every six months you need to blow out the machine, right under it 5-2 is a article on adjusting the spark gaps.. there on the right side facing control panel. IT says not to reface tungsten points, replace.. so don't file them.. (like we did a hundred old cars). I guess they are like platinum spark plugs in cars? once they run, don't mess with them..

The saftey gap is not in the "end electrode circuit".. but in the generated circuit. T3, on the secondary and into T4 isolation transformer that delivers it into the electrode circuit. NOT bleeding off the excess output voltage directly, only the stimulated voltage from T3..
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Old 01-26-2012, 05:34 PM
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Thanks David. Well it looks like something else to do now . I need to check the argon line inside the welder anyways. It leaks down with the welder and the tank shut off. Checked the easy stuff on the outside already and as long as I'm inside I might as well check that too.
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  #16  
Old 01-26-2012, 07:27 PM
L110BINDER L110BINDER is offline
 
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I know it's off the subject of electricity, but it is on the subject of safety.
Check and double check for flammables. Knew a man who had a can of gas on the opposite side of the garage. The vapors traveled accross the floor and when he started welding, they ignited.
Months of treatment, surgeries, lost work, and scarred for life.
Aerosols too close can have bad results too.
Everybody already knows these things, but we all get careless sometimes.
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  #17  
Old 01-27-2012, 12:40 PM
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Default How about rubber mats?

I think I remember going into a college workshop where they had rubber mats on the floor next to the welding cubicles. Did I dream this?

Would rubber mats be a good idea? I mean from an electrical insulating perspective I guess so - but with sparks flying about the place...
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