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History of sheetmetal working power hammers History of Yoders, Pettingel, Quickway and other sheetmetal working power hammers

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  #1  
Old 11-28-2010, 01:40 PM
Superiorracing Superiorracing is offline
 
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Default PARX Power Hammer Type 49/00

Dear all,

after quite some time of lurking, finally I have something o contribute.

As I suffer from tool addiction in a particular severe form, I couldn´t resist to bid when I found a vintage power hammer on ebay about one year ago. As my best friend is a tool addict to the same extend, he offered space for the machine, to pay half of the price and to pick up the machine near the French border. An ideal situation! The vague description and the poor photo did not attract many competitors, so we scored the hammer for a rather symbolic price.

While the auction was active I tried to find information concerning that power hammer on the internet – without success. Earlier this year I tried again and found the following video on youtube showing a geniously constructed blacksmithing-hammer:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PXOTWPu1E4A

The translation of the authors comment reads:
The first part of the movie shows the assembly of a PARX power hammer mod 19 "Type 1" manufactured by Johann Kunz Sons of Kronberg / Taunus. Particularly shown is the construction of the stroke adjustment which was invented in 1908 by Johann Kunz and is patented. The second part of the film shows how sensitive could be forged with the PARX power hammer. The historic recordings originate approximately 1930.

I sent a mail to the originator of that film and offered to supply pictures of our hammer. It appeared that he is an offspring of the constructor and was pleased to hear of the existence of our example because according to his knowledge it is the last survivor. Not only that he sent a copy of a works brochure, he even offered to research the family archive for information concerning our particular machine. In the end he even sent a scan of the original file card indicating manufacture, specification, delivery and the name of the customer – What a lucky chance!

He mentioned that he would like to see a film of the hammer in action. As a small gratitude we tried to produce a decent video – but that didn’t work quite well. Fortunately there is a video-wizard among our friends who offered to help. His masterpiece can now be seen here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2qnaOWcvmoY&feature=mfu_in_order&list=UL

The first picture of the video is the first page of the brochure.

Hope you enjoy it.
Tilman

PS: The Gentleman in the video is not me.
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  #2  
Old 11-28-2010, 02:14 PM
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oldgoaly oldgoaly is offline
 
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Thanks for posting! Very interesting slider mechanism in the Model 19. I hope Tim Barton has already found this info, or it will need to be added in the 1st revision. Take care! tt Sent Tim an email with link to this thread, so he knows! He just can't stop at 7 books 10 or 12 would be nice <wink>
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Done!
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Sluggo...87845251266156 Take care! tt

Last edited by oldgoaly; 11-30-2010 at 03:52 PM. Reason: add note
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Old 11-28-2010, 02:50 PM
rustydog rustydog is offline
 
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Interesting , I know of another one in the Black forest.... unless that one is yours at the restoration shop

is the arm on yours wood ?

Rusty
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Old 11-28-2010, 05:45 PM
Richard K Richard K is offline
 
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Tilman,

Interesting hammer, the model 19.

The eccentric sets the connecting rod in motion. What is the long skewed pinions purpose? it drives the rack inside the eccentric, but theskewed pinion appears to be anchored in the casting on the right. That casing, the one with two trunnions must be controlled by something that moves it right to left. Is that a part of a variable stroke mechanism?
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Old 11-29-2010, 01:58 PM
Superiorracing Superiorracing is offline
 
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Terry, I am sure this machine is worth being mentioned in Tims book. Why don’t you give him a hint?

Rusty, our hammer was delivered to Saarbrücken in 1954 and was in use there until we picked it up last year. The one you know of must be another example. Do you have a picture of the machine?
Yes the beam is made of wood; I would expect it to be Ash but can not tell if that’s true.

Richard, the terms you use are beyond my vocabulary, sorry. I understand how the mechanism is working, the only thing I can not recognise in the video is how the lever the assemblyman is pushing back and forth at 1:32 is operated by the blacksmith while forging. I am quite sure it is operated by foot but I can not see how.

By the way: the stroke adjustment mechanism of our 49/00 is completely different from the type 19 in the old film. Ours has a crankshaft where the axis through the crank pin and the rod journal are not parallel but a little bit angled. The conrod runs on a spacer with an angled hole in it. By adjusting the crankshaft sideways you can change the stroke. Not easy to explain in a foreign language. Hope you understand what I am trying to express…

Tilman
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Old 11-29-2010, 05:24 PM
rustydog rustydog is offline
 
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Hi

I will send you the info on the other one ,

Do you have the Patent numbers for Parx machines ?

That might give some answers

Rusty
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Old 11-29-2010, 06:57 PM
Richard K Richard K is offline
 
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Tilman,

I thought about the different terms and how they may translate. I understand the difficulty. Also I thought you had the same type of machine.

I will look at the video again for clues.

Thank you for the reply
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  #8  
Old 11-29-2010, 08:40 PM
Richard K Richard K is offline
 
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Default Inside the PARX model 19

I spent some more time looking at the video of the Model 19. The workings of that machine are stunning!

The machine is more of a helve hammer than a power hammer as we think of them. But what a beautiful Helve Hammer the PARX model 19 appears to be! This helve solves the problems of all the helves we have discussed on this forum.

First. The PARX model 19 has an adjustable stroke. Not only adjustable, but adjustable while the machine is operating. The crankshaft spins constantly. With the foot pedal at rest (up), the eccentric is centered and no connecting rod motion results. As the foot pedal is depressed, the eccentric is moved off center and the hammer begins with short strokes. As the foot pedal is further depressed the stroke increases. The gear rack inside the block carrying the eccentric is moved as the square bar with the skewed gear teeth (I know of no descriptor for such a gear) slides from right to left. The pedal is connected to the square sliding gear bar by the links low on the right side of the column.

Second, The connecting rod is adjustable, Dial in the perfect gap between upper and lower die. A ratchet is built in to the connecting rod. The adjustment, I suspect, is by right and left hand threads like a turnbuckle. A smaller gap will also soften the hit. Short stroke- small die gap - medium speed equals tappy-tap quiet mechanical planishing

Third. The PARX has real leaf springs. And two leaf springs at that. Each unit is a bound package of leafs, quarter ecliptics, like those on a race car from the golden age. The friction (sliding) between the spring leafs acts like damper. I would suspect this machine would not flail or bounce the arm wildly as we have seen some helves in action.

Fourth. The upper spring anchor point is adjustable, toward and away from the operator. Tip a die forward or backward and a new shape (die edge) is presented to the work.

Fifth. The lower tool post holder is screw adjustable in the x and y directions. Again this feature opens up some possibilities for creative die combinations.

The downside: The machine is a bit complex. The stroke adjustment would be a challenge to build.

Tilman, you have shared some exciting information with us. Thank you and welcome.

Who will be the first to build one of these?
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  #9  
Old 11-30-2010, 03:53 AM
rustydog rustydog is offline
 
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the latter model Parx (built around 1950) that I know of is really more a plannishing machine, or light formimg,
I think it was used to smooth out the walnuts after hammer and sandbag.

it almost humms when in use, very short stroke and pretty fast hits

At least thats how it is used now......

Rusty
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  #10  
Old 11-30-2010, 03:27 PM
Superiorracing Superiorracing is offline
 
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Rusty, I have received news that the blueprints indicate Hickory as the wood for the beam and Ash as an alternative material. Judging by the colour of our beam I would say it is Hickory.

There is no indication of a patent number at the machine and I have no clue if they applied for overseas-patents.

You are right, the 49/00 hits fast and the stroke is short as you can see in the video, second link in post #1, but I don’t think it is only capable of smoothing out the walnuts. The brochure lists a lower die with rubber inlay for fast forming and there has even a stretching and shrinking tool been available for that machine. None of them came with our machine but we will at least replicate the rubber die.

Richard, you are right, the type 19 is a brilliant machine but I think the 49/00 is more than equal. I will try to take a few detail pictures of the mechanism next time I am in the shop.
I have only posted the link, the honour for sharing the film is due to PARXJKS on youtube.
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