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Maxxdout
04-15-2010, 11:35 AM
I’m in the market for a Drill Press around the $500.00 range and want to stick with American made. However, I have a few questions that I could use assistance with.

1) Does anyone have any recommendations on manufacturers and or models? I was considering a Houdaille Powermatic 1150. A friend of mine has one sitting in the corner of his shop that I might be able to get for a fair price.

2) Considering that I drill primarily metal. What is an acceptable pulley speed? I was thinking around 500 RPM, but I honestly don’t know.

3) Also again considering that its primary usage will be metal does the number of step pulleys really matter? This seems to be a big advertising point.

4) Is there a motor HP range, or better yet, a motor amperage I should strive for? I can accommodate Single Phase 220 in my shop.

Thanks in advance for the assistance.
Chris

James(Western Canada)
04-15-2010, 12:05 PM
As far as size goes, I would try to stay around 1/2HP or more, the 1/4 & 1/3 will not get the job done on heavier (thicker) pieces, or on larger OD bits, etc

Technically, every size drill requires a different speed (RPM), so all those pulleys is what give you the flexibility to adjust the speed of the spindle to get as close as possible. There are many tables/charts available online, or from your local jobber that will list speed for various sizes, as well as materials....here are a couple......(if you happen to own a copy of the Machineries Handbook, it's all in there)

Google search for drill rpm charts
http://www.google.ca/#hl=en&source=hp&q=drill+rpm+chart&meta=&aq=0&aqi=g3g-m6&aql=&oq=drill+rpm&gs_rfai=&fp=e751b818faa768f4

hit #1
http://www.ibiblio.org/twa/info/drillSpeedChart.pdf

hit # 2
http://www.raygirling.com/dpspeed.htm

hit # 3
http://its.fvtc.edu/machshop1/drillpress/cutspeeds.htm

geoking
04-15-2010, 12:17 PM
Chris,
You do not need to spend $500 on a drill press. I just went to Craigslist Denver and a really nice one is $250. Yes...I did find a commercial Powermatic variable speed with tilting table listed for $750 . My guess is $500 cash would buy it. Anything with 5 speeds is good. You'll need slow with a little cutting oil for steel and faster with alchohol for aluminum. As for horsepower, not a big deal as long as you dont have huge holes and a big arm. Like James says...1/2 hp should do the trick.
George

Doug98105
04-15-2010, 12:25 PM
$500 should get you a nice older American made DP. I have three old Atlas/Craftsman and one old Rockwell. I don't think I paid $500 total for all of them. Any one of mine is better than the best of the foreign junk.


1) The Powermatic 1150 should be a good one. Myself, I would stay away from DP's with mechanical variable speed, they're trouble in the long run. A step pulley machine is best, IMO, quieter and maintenance free..

2) Most of the older American made 15" DP's like this were rated for about 1/2" drilling in steel. 500rpm is about right for 1/2" in mild steel.

3) No, you don't need all the speeds offered on some dp"s. They have all those speeds because they have an intermediate speed reduction pulley. By switching the belts around in all possible configurations they come up with all those possible speeds. Usually it's more trouble than it's worth to do all the belt switching.

4) Between 1/2 and 1hp would be a good size motor. If you should come across a good deal on a machine with a three phase motor you can always add a VFD to run off your single phase shop power.

Doug

bob haverstock
04-15-2010, 02:49 PM
I’m in the market for a Drill Press around the $500.00 range and want to stick with American made. However, I have a few questions that I could use assistance with.

1) Does anyone have any recommendations on manufacturers and or models? I was considering a Houdaille Powermatic 1150. A friend of mine has one sitting in the corner of his shop that I might be able to get for a fair price.

2) Considering that I drill primarily metal. What is an acceptable pulley speed? I was thinking around 500 RPM, but I honestly don’t know.

3) Also again considering that its primary usage will be metal does the number of step pulleys really matter? This seems to be a big advertising point.

4) Is there a motor HP range, or better yet, a motor amperage I should strive for? I can accommodate Single Phase 220 in my shop.

Thanks in advance for the assistance.
Chris

Chris,

Walker Turner is an old American brand. They were used heavily in manufacturing from the "50's thru the '60's. There are still alot of them out there. They ranged from single spindle bench models to large 6 spindle gang drills. A 20" Walker Turner in good condition is a good tool to have. Check the auction sites.

For what it is worth, a machine with a low 0f 500 RPM is good for a 1/2" drill in mid steel. 250 RPMs is good for a 1" hole in mild steel ( HSS drill bits) 250 to 2000 RPMs will catch most of the speeds needed. Most of the large Walker Turners used Morse taper spindles. Boice Crane is another good old American brand. I believe that Delta somewhere along the line acquired Walker Turner.

There are some drill presses out there that are worth $500. Most should be in the fifty dollar to two hundred fifty dollar range.

Please do yourself a big favor, use a drill vise and save your fingers for later.

Bob Haverstock

oldgoaly
04-15-2010, 03:24 PM
I second Bob's advise on a vise, add a x-y table and pipe holding jig like Bill Gibson posted awhile back (maybe he will repost it if it got lost) you will have a very useful tool! Those cheap 119 pc drill bit sets from tiawan work rather well. One more thing to help your drill bits last longer a spray bottle of water and just a little dishwashing soap (rust retarder), it works for me and should for you. tt

Peter Miles
04-15-2010, 09:36 PM
Chris,
You do not need to spend $500 on a drill press. I just went to Craigslist Denver and a really nice one is $250. Yes...I did find a commercial Powermatic variable speed with tilting table listed for $750 . My guess is $500 cash would buy it. Anything with 5 speeds is good. You'll need slow with a little cutting oil for steel and faster with alchohol for aluminum. As for horsepower, not a big deal as long as you dont have huge holes and a big arm. Like James says...1/2 hp should do the trick.
George

I don't remember ever hearing/seeing the suggestion for using alcohol on aluminum before, George.

Another item that was new to me recently was learning that you shouldn't use drill bits with black oxide coating in aluminum, but rather the shiny polished ones. I've certainly noticed that aluminum does tend to stick to the black oxide drill bits.

anders nørgaard
04-16-2010, 06:04 AM
I don't remember ever hearing/seeing the suggestion for using alcohol on aluminum before, George.
....

Good for cast iron and brazz as well ;)

Peter Miles
04-16-2010, 07:43 AM
Chris, this outfit is nowhere near you, and I don't intend this as a sales recommendation, but for educational purposes on different types of drill presses, look at the offerings at this dealer:

http://www.hgrindustrialsurplus.com/sub/search_results.aspx?k=1&searchKeyword=drill%20press&searchCategory=&sortExpression=&sortASC=&pageSize=&searchMethod=description (http://www.hgrindustrialsurplus.com/sub/search_results.aspx?k=1&searchKeyword=drill%20press&searchCategory=&sortExpression=&sortASC=&pageSize=&searchMethod=description)

Equipment prices are very regional, so they won't mean much in your area, but they do list a lot of different brands and models and show pictures of them. As most are industrial machines, they are probably predominately 3-phase machines, however.

There are a few good sized machinery dealers in the Denver area, or at least there were a few years ago.

shortbus
04-16-2010, 08:20 AM
Chris, this outfit is nowhere near you, and I don't intend this as a sales recommendation, but for educational purposes on different types of drill presses, look at the offerings at this dealer:

http://www.hgrindustrialsurplus.com/sub/search_results.aspx?k=1&searchKeyword=drill%20press&searchCategory=&sortExpression=&sortASC=&pageSize=&searchMethod=description (http://www.hgrindustrialsurplus.com/sub/search_results.aspx?k=1&searchKeyword=drill%20press&searchCategory=&sortExpression=&sortASC=&pageSize=&searchMethod=description)

<snip>

Peter, I am lucky enough to live within easy driving distance of HGR! I have no affiliation with them, other than being a very satisfied customer.

For anyone living in the near vicinity to them, you can't do wrong with buying from them. If you show up in person the listed prices are often discounted by a good margin if you ask.

When I want something in machinery or industrial thats my first place to look.

cary

Carbuilder
04-16-2010, 08:27 AM
Ok I will throw my 2 cents in if you have 500 to spend I would consider looking for a mill drill then you have 2 tools in one. I use my mill more for drilling then my drill press just a thought.

geoking
04-16-2010, 08:49 AM
Peter,
It doesnt leave a mess...it just goes away. smile. Plus, if you have ever worked in a machine shop, you always know when you have been sprayed on the back side as you go by the prankster. Add to a hand squeeze type bottle with a 90 degree spout. It works great whether drilling or milling.
George

I don't remember ever hearing/seeing the suggestion for using alcohol on aluminum before, George.

Another item that was new to me recently was learning that you shouldn't use drill bits with black oxide coating in aluminum, but rather the shiny polished ones. I've certainly noticed that aluminum does tend to stick to the black oxide drill bits.

Maxxdout
04-16-2010, 11:35 AM
Wow! Great assistance everyone I really appreciate it. I particularly appreciate the recommendation to lower my budget. I’m looking at a Rockwell 15-069 that spins from 680 – 4600 RPM for around $150.00. Based on the speed chart that was provided earlier 7/16” – 5/8” is recommended to spin at 600 and 11/16”-1” is recommended to spin at 350. Given that this press doesn’t into the 300-600 range what are the repercussions of drilling at 680 RPM with 7/16” – 1” bit’s at this higher speed? My assumption would be burned bit’s. Therefore, should this unit be avoided?

Thanks,
Chris

Doug98105
04-16-2010, 03:30 PM
Chris,

When you mention various drill sizes, are you talking about drilling steel? As I said previously, these type drill presses are only rated for about 1/2" in steel. That's why they don't have lower rpm's. 680 is almost exactly the right speed for a 1/2" drill in mild steel.

Googling the 15-069 model, I see that's one of Rockwell's lower end machines. A good way to determine the quality level of Rockwell DP's is whether they have a two spoke, plain downfeed handle. The heavier duty models have a three spoke handle with plastic knobs. They may appear the same outwardly, but there are some significant differences in the heavier duty models.

Here's a link to the heavier duty version of the 15" DP.

http://seattle.craigslist.org/see/tls/1694258624.html

Doug

Rasper
04-16-2010, 04:10 PM
Better to drill too slow than too fast. I usually keep mine on a speed that is suitable for 1/2 inch bits in mild steel and use it for everything smaller, unless I am drilling really small: under 1/16 inch. Of course I am lazy.

R

MP&C
04-16-2010, 07:26 PM
If you have the floor space, one of these radial arm drill presses are nice, this is a 1969 vintage Delta-Rockwell that I have $116 in, the amount to replace the worn out chuck. The T slot table comes in handy for clamping.


http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y167/rmccartney/McCartney%20Paint%20and%20Custom-Shop%20Eqpt/PIC531.png

Brian McCollim
04-16-2010, 09:15 PM
Peter, I am lucky enough to live within easy driving distance of HGR! I have no affiliation with them, other than being a very satisfied customer.

For anyone living in the near vicinity to them, you can't do wrong with buying from them. If you show up in person the listed prices are often discounted by a good margin if you ask.

When I want something in machinery or industrial thats my first place to look.

cary
Cary, How far are they from Youngstown? How good are the discounts when you get there? Just wondering. I need some odds and ends, do they allow browsing?

shortbus
04-17-2010, 08:28 AM
Cary, How far are they from Youngstown? How good are the discounts when you get there? Just wondering. I need some odds and ends, do they allow browsing?

Brian, about 1 - 1 1/2 hour, depending on road work going on.

The discounts depend on how long it's been in inventory. The longer they've had it, the better the discount.

Yeah, they allow browsing, the building is a old GM plant. 12 acres under roof, they say. Always run out of money before I see every thing:)

Here's their web site; http://www.hgrindustrialsurplus.com/
They always have more stuff that's not on the web. The web just shows some of the latest stuff they got in. Call them if there's is some thing special you need.

Have fun if you go there. And let me know what you think.

cary