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Pedalcar
09-03-2006, 10:24 AM
Hi Gang ,

we don't know anymore who posted pictures of a setup on a mill to roll tubes or flat stock but we used it and with succes.

HE GETS ALL THE CREDIT FOR THIS.

Emile made some rolls to attach to his mill and today we had tryout on this new tool.

Emile needed to roll flat steel stock 10 x 100 mm in a radius to make a design table frame.

By switching the rotatian direction and a 1mm move of the table (upwort)after one sesion, we rolled several pieces.

Enjoy the pic's they speek for themself,i think.

Ben an Emile.

http://www.metalmeet.com/photopost/data/505/medium/IMG_0632.JPG

http://www.metalmeet.com/photopost/data/505/medium/IMG_0633.JPG

http://www.metalmeet.com/photopost/data/505/medium/IMG_0634.JPG

http://www.metalmeet.com/photopost/data/505/medium/IMG_0635.JPG

http://www.metalmeet.com/photopost/data/505/medium/IMG_0637.JPG

http://www.metalmeet.com/photopost/data/505/medium/IMG_0638.JPG

http://www.metalmeet.com/photopost/data/505/medium/IMG_0640.JPG

oldgoaly
09-03-2006, 11:04 AM
Geez, now i guess i got a reason to pull the jackshaft out of my horizontal mill and clean the old grease out and get it running. What a great idea Emile!
Here i was begining to believe horz mills were big paper weights! 1943 producto mill, very little hours of running time lots of years in storage!

Thanks Ben for passing that along!
tt

anders nørgaard
09-03-2006, 11:23 AM
Hi Gang ,

we don't know anymore who posted pictures of a setup on a mill to roll tubes or flat stock but we used it and with succes.

HE GETS ALL THE CREDIT FOR THIS.



Hi Ben and Emile,
Great work as usual!

It was joatmon (EZ) who rolled some stringers for a plane on his Bridgeport http://www.metalmeet.com/forum/images/icons/icon6.gif

http://www.metalmeet.com/forum/showthread.php?t=4501&highlight=ring+roller

Pedalcar
09-03-2006, 11:47 AM
Thanks Anders,

what would we do without you, i was hoping that you would jump in and solve our problem :p;)

Ben

Pedalcar
09-03-2006, 11:49 AM
Geez, now i guess i got a reason to pull the jackshaft out of my horizontal mill and clean the old grease out and get it running. What a great idea Emile!
Here i was begining to believe horz mills were big paper weights! 1943 producto mill, very little hours of running time lots of years in storage!

Thanks Ben for passing that along!
tt

Thanks Terry,

hope you get it done.

Ben

Boogiemanz1
09-03-2006, 12:21 PM
They will almost pay you to take old horizontal mills around here.........I may just latch on to one...........john

Pedalcar
09-03-2006, 12:45 PM
Hi John,

i know ,Emile had one and he tried to sell it for years.

Now he has finaly sold it (about 1 year ago) and this memory is popping up because he had to make something that came along his path.:roll:


Now the horizontal mill would have stayed and would be a rolling machine for the rest of his life.Hope this won't raise the price.

Ben

PaulG
09-03-2006, 06:21 PM
Although not as robust, with an adapter a similar thing can be done on an ewheel. Here is some 1" square 16ga aluminum tubing.

http://mishami.image.pbase.com/o4/58/490358/1/60784294.066F3701.jpg

Boogiemanz1
09-03-2006, 09:14 PM
That would be a great use for one, I have an indexer and rotary table that have a lot of uses with a horizontal mill also.........hmmmm.......now I'm looking......have to get some building stretchers too.........Thanks guys.........john

Pedalcar
09-03-2006, 10:15 PM
http://www.metalmeet.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=1617


Remember this superb one from Dema, it is so easy to make that you forget about it

Ben

doug_walter2002
09-04-2006, 07:28 AM
A building Stretcher, Now that is one tool I could really use.

Joefish
09-04-2006, 09:31 AM
Although not as robust, with an adapter a similar thing can be done on an ewheel. Here is some 1" square 16ga aluminum tubing.

http://mishami.image.pbase.com/o4/58/490358/1/60784294.066F3701.jpg

That is cool !

edwardd_
09-04-2006, 09:45 AM
Paul,

How much did this set up 'crimp' for lack of a better word the inside portion of the bend?

Thanks

David



Although not as robust, with an adapter a similar thing can be done on an ewheel. Here is some 1" square 16ga aluminum tubing.

http://mishami.image.pbase.com/o4/58/490358/1/60784294.066F3701.jpg

PaulG
09-04-2006, 06:21 PM
Well I have to admit, the tubing was anealed first as it was 6061 T6. As far as distortion, there was some bowing of the outside walls and a little wavyness on the inner radius, but overall still pretty square after a 180 degree bend and a 14" radius. And of course, it wanted to twist also, and required "tweeking" between passes. Not a replacment for a "real" bender but if you already have a ewheel it can pass as a light duty ring roller.

joatmon
09-07-2006, 10:17 PM
Hello Ben and Emile,
I think you are referring to my post, and Anders linked it , for credit. I am flattered that you folks were able to use the concept and very pleased as well. That's why I posted it so that others with a little intuition and ambition would carpe diem!! Seize the idea and run with it. Well done. I may have stated it earlier that those others reading this may be able to do this concept w/o milling machines, they can do this with a lathe as well....think about it.
There are going to be some that chastize the abusive work on these machines... blather!!! They are your tools use them safely and wisely and as you see fit.


Oh yeah, I am still working on that engine cowl. Have been distracted with other duties on the project like fabric covering. That's a characteristic of restoring an airplane as this.....it covers all trades...woodwork, paint, welding, engine work, plumbing, machining, seamstress work, upholstery and of course sheetmetal. Mosly all aluminum sheetmetal thank goodness!!! :smile:
Well done Pedalcar and we'll check back later with a progress report on the cowl.

1smoothline
09-07-2006, 10:55 PM
Great original post joatmon and very cool aircraft as well. Any Idea what a conservative maximum material size might be for a mill like yours?

joatmon
09-08-2006, 08:29 AM
Hello Jim,
I may have mentioned that the mill I used is an old abused "discipline" mill (this is the one you send the apprentice to for corrective action! :twisted: ). I was not too concerned if the head fell off as long as it didn't end up on any of my appendages. :grin: None the less, if you are not to worried about the abuse given the mill I would say that 1.25dia X .08 6061T6 unannealed aluminum would be about the max. There are however a great many things that can assist in increasing capacity. I had a relatively large radius to deal with (17.75"), and to decrease the amount of forces involved the two table mounted dies could be way farther apart and as such it is obvious that leverage to the driver die is decreased dramaticaly. The draw back is there will be required increased die travel to get to the same final radius. With a CAD program of sorts you could easily strike up a balance of distances to accomplish the desired radius, force, and adequate axis travels. You will note that Pedalcar's setup will be limited to how far the table mounted dies can be spread versus radius available before the driver die strikes the table. A limiting factor when utilizing a horizontal mill. The great part of their rig is they have complete adjustability...my rig is limited to the hole spread in the tie plates. For mine to change to decrease feed pressure, I would need to make new tie plates.
One can look at commercially made rollers and they are massive. But at the same time they usually have very narrow roller spread and thus need the stout construction.
Another factor to consider when planning roller spread is the wider the spread the less the felt force is on the driver AND thus the greater the accuracy for feed increment. It may take a final infeed of 1/32 with a 20" spread versus .005" for a 6" spread.
And lastly, there is the dead end. I chose the spread I used based on the fact I knew what developed length of tube required and the available tube length. I could only readily acquire 12' length and this might get close as I needed at least 10'. With a wide roller spread there is a wider "dead" or spoilage end before the tube is on all three rollers. I chose 11" spread this means I would have close to 10" of untrue bend on each end of ring....that's getting REAL close to using all of that 12' stick to get a 10' developed length!!

There is a great deal of experimentation but a bit of planning can greatly reduce it. Hope this helps. EZ

Flattracker94
02-20-2013, 07:30 PM
Would a set of lower rollers with a V machined in them work for round tubing? Can't tell from the photos but is the drive roller knurled?

Gonejunking
02-20-2013, 08:30 PM
Yes a V would roll tube. The pressure from the rollers is enough to drive the tube without knurling the rollers themselves.

dave r
02-20-2013, 11:49 PM
oh for a workshop with enough head space

i have the mill, but no room above it for things like that