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wingmen13
12-18-2005, 12:19 PM
What is the easiest way to measure for wheel spacers on a motorcyle? I have tried a few ways and still always seem to be too short on one side. I am trying to space the wheel in the direct center of the frame. I measure from the outside of the wheel bearing to the inside of the frame. The space (distance) between the two is limited.

David

anders nørgaard
12-18-2005, 12:51 PM
What is the easiest way to measure for wheel spacers on a motorcyle? I have tried a few ways and still always seem to be too short on one side. I am trying to space the wheel in the direct center of the frame. I measure from the outside of the wheel bearing to the inside of the frame. The space (distance) between the two is limited.

David

Hi David,
The easiest (and most accurate) would be to use a dial gauge.
Mount the wheel in the frame.
Press it to one of the sides.
mount the dial gauge using a magnetic holder.
"Zero" the gauge.
Press the wheel (gently, not to damage the gauge :o ) to the other side of the frame.
Read the gauge and divide by 2! http://www.metalmeet.com/forum/images/icons/icon6.gif

(if you don't have a dial gauge, you might be able to do it with a vernier's caliper and a helper to move the wheel) http://www.metalmeet.com/forum/images/icons/icon3.gif

wingmen13
12-18-2005, 01:03 PM
I'm not sure what you mean. The bearing are recessed slightly into the rim. If I understand correctly you say push the rim to one side and mount the gauge on the axle(?) and then push the rim over (?). I understand that would give me the distance which would need to be dividied by two.

David

anders nørgaard
12-18-2005, 01:12 PM
I'm not sure what you mean. The bearing are recessed slightly into the rim. If I understand correctly you say push the rim to one side and mount the gauge on the axle(?) and then push the rim over (?). I understand that would give me the distance which would need to be dividied by two.

David

Hi David,
Oh! Hadn't thought of the bearings being recessed http://www.metalmeet.com/forum/images/icons/icon11.gif
It can still be done (almost) the same way.
Insert 2 identical spacers too small but big enough to let the hub clear off the frame when pushed to the side.
Some procedure as in my previous post.
Now you know how much to add to the "spacer size" you installed to do the measuring.

Mount the gauge on the hub (close to the bearing) that will be more accurate than the rim!

Hold on! I'll make a drawing to show what I mean http://www.metalmeet.com/forum/images/icons/icon10.gif
Be back in 5.... or 7.

anders nørgaard
12-18-2005, 01:34 PM
Hi David,

OK... took a little longer http://www.metalmeet.com/forum/images/icons/icon10.gif
Hope this "quick draw" makes sense http://www.metalmeet.com/forum/images/icons/icon12.gif

http://www.metalmeet.com/photopost/data/500/Hub_Spacer.jpg

edwardd_
12-18-2005, 01:43 PM
Anders,

You make the drawing look sooooooo easy to a pure novice.

Thanks. Very clear. Glad there is no accent to math and drawings!

LOL

anders nørgaard
12-18-2005, 01:47 PM
David,

It is sooo easy http://www.metalmeet.com/forum/images/icons/icon12.gif Glad you liked ithttp://www.metalmeet.com/forum/images/icons/icon7.gif

I'll have to work on the accent http://www.metalmeet.com/forum/images/icons/icon10.gif http://www.metalmeet.com/forum/images/icons/icon10.gif http://www.metalmeet.com/forum/images/icons/icon10.gif

Boogiemanz1
12-18-2005, 11:16 PM
Normally just centering the wheel isn't all that is involved. If your bike uses a front wheel speedometer drive, and where the brake rotor (if disc brake) centers in the pads and pins.


First, if there is a brake attached to the fork leg, and the wheel has a rotor on it, as well as a spacer long enough to stick outside the hub when pressed against the bearing, on each side.... install the axle and tighten the axle nut. Some axles have a spacer built in on the non threaded end. If the brake caliper will move on the fork leg, set it in the center of it's movement with the pads retracted and the rotor centered between the pads. When this space is established, measure the distance from the bearing spacer to the inside of the fork leg using calipers, snap gages, or a pair of dividers. That measurement added to the length of the bearing spacer will be the correct length for that side. Once you have that spacer built and installed, measure the other side and build it. Check end play according to service manual.

If there is a front wheel drive speedometer in the equation, determine the side that it needs to mount on and shorten that spacer the thickness of the drive.

If you have this done and your wheel is decidely off to one side, determine the distance from the center of the hub to the center of the fork tubes. Make a disk rotor spacer to offset the rotor that distance toward the fork leg, shorten the spacer on the other side of the hub that much, then add that much to the brake side spacer......................nuthin to it..................john

wingmen13
12-19-2005, 06:18 PM
I could kick myself in the ass!!! You made that sooo easy I can't believe I didn't think of it. That little trick is going in my techniques folder. Thanks.

David

thepartsbrothers
12-19-2005, 10:24 PM
All of the info has been right on the money. I have a couple of questions though. Have you accounted for bearing end play in the wheel and do you have the transmission/transmission pulley centered? There are very few bikes with the wheel perfectly centered in the frame. More often than not you have to account for the rotor and brake setup to determine the spacing.

Just thought I would add 2 cents worth. I own a bike shop and this is one of the most critical steps when doing a build.

Thanks

anders nørgaard
12-20-2005, 04:45 AM
Hi David,
You're welcome. Don't kick yourself to hard http://www.metalmeet.com/forum/images/icons/icon10.gif

Thepartsbrothers (insert real name here... more friendly and we are a friendly bunch here) http://www.metalmeet.com/forum/images/icons/icon7.gif
Welcome to MM
Below you can see what David wanted to do and that was the job I gave him info on. Nothing else has been taken into account!

What is the easiest way to measure for wheel spacers on a motorcyle? I have tried a few ways and still always seem to be too short on one side. I am trying to space the wheel in the direct center of the frame. I measure from the outside of the wheel bearing to the inside of the frame. The space (distance) between the two is limited.

David

wingmen13
12-20-2005, 05:41 AM
I appreciate your advice. Here is what I have done:

1. Lined up the motor and tranny.

2. Installed the correct sprockets.

3. put on the chain to get an eyes view center.

The bike is a 50 panhead, with an open belt primary.

I am using a GMA disc brake. I haven't put the brake on yet. The rim I am using is for a 200 series tire and has sealed bearings. I think I have done everything correctly (not my first build, but the first time I am trying to make my own spacers).

David

Timmy_k
12-20-2005, 02:52 PM
Pvc tube with 3/4" or 1" I.D., depending on axle size, is alot easier for mock up. You may have to turn down O.D. to fit recess at the hub. Once you get proper fitment using PVC, transfer measurement to your steel tubing and cut your spacers.


tim K:)