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View Full Version : Geting a new Lathe. 3 in one ?


ERausch
02-01-2005, 09:47 AM
Hi all
I have been looking at a Grizzly 3 in 1 lathe but after really looking at the specs I have decided not to go the 3 in 1 route. I found that the slowest spindle speed on the lathe to be circa 340 rpm that in my opinion is to fast to cut large bulky items let alone threads.The 3 in 1 Price is about 2,900

What I have decided to go with is this
http://www.billstoolcrib.com/Lathbir1236.htm
http://www.billstoolcrib.com/RONGFU.HTM

the cost is a bit more but I believe that the performance will be much greater the cost for both of these combined is about 3.500 Yes the cost is more but I think it will be worth it.

I know that a lot of guys that belong to this site have quite a bit of experience with Lathes and Mills. What I would like is if you all could take a look at these items and let me know what you think about them. I do have some Lathe experience but that was during a class that I had taken in collage in 1973 :) so pretty much everything that I had learned is lost.
Thanks for your time
Earl

kenklose
02-01-2005, 11:09 AM
I'm shopping for a lathe too. I noticed that the mill you linked to is made in Taiwan which I understand is supposed to be decent quality. The lathe doesn't mention a made in.

The other thing I didn't see on the lathe (might have missed it) is what type of bearings are in the spindle. As a sheetmetal guy I hope to use my lathe (some of the time) for metal spinning. I've read that this puts a thrust load on the spindle bearings. Conical bearings (someone correct me if I'm wrong) don't take thrust loads well, but ball bearings do.

Gonejunking
02-01-2005, 11:17 AM
Hi guy's
You've got your bearings backward.
cone bearings will take a side load, more so then a ball bearing.

Look at your cars front wheel bearings, cone, to take the side loads.

I had one of those mill/drill machines. I biggest complaint was the tool holder was a taper fit in the spindle, and would work loose under moderate side loads. If yours has a thru bolt like a bridgeport then you should be OK.
Just my 2c

rsanter
02-01-2005, 11:59 AM
for anyone interested, I have a old pratt&whitney lathe for sale ( I am moving) that has been partly rebuilt.
email me at rsanter@aol.com

Hemirambler
02-01-2005, 02:30 PM
Hi Earl, The personal opinions on SFD machines versus USED industrial equipment has been hashed out several times here so I won't share my admittedly opinion with that regard. Beyond that, the lateh pictured is a nice size for the home guy, but the quality (for the money) is a bit underwhelming. AS for spinning - I've only toyed around with it doing some aluminum, brass and copper - biggest part was a small lamp shade (trouble light sized) - given this experience I would say the lathe ought to be ok for spinning. Keep in mind a metal lathe "see's" a fair amount of loading normally - both radial and axially. The simplification of ball or tapered isn't really practical for this application as metal lathes were built with BOTH (my Rockwell has tapered - my Clausing has ball) remember ball bearings can be designed to withstand axial or radial loads - the spindle bearing on your car is a great example - but if you look back the older cars used ball bearing spindles. Angular Contact for instance are designed for BOTH loads.


The mill - hmnnn first thought is YUK!!! This might be suitable for your needs, but personally I'd hold out for something that has a KNEE - loosing position everytime you move the head is gonna be a total drag. The travel between the spindle and table - minus your vice is likely gonna have you moving the head more than less -amplifying an already annoying design. Personally I'd pass on the MILL/DRILL even moreso with the current price of used Bridgeports - and if those are too large - I'd hold out for a small knee mill - hardinge - clausing - deckel - there's a bizzilion. I'm NOT saying you COULDN'T crank out decent part with this - but your gonna be limited on so many fronts.

There!! I kept my tongue bit down on pretty hard!!!!!!!


Good Luck!!!!!!


Jacin in Ohio

champkrt1
04-24-2005, 09:20 PM
Is this what you are talking about when you say a mill with a knee instead?

http://www.grizzly.com/products/item.cfm?itemnumber=G3102&

Thanks in advance!!

Eddie

Kevbo
04-25-2005, 03:58 PM
That one has a knee.

Having a knee allows boring holes with no taper using a boring head. Allows milling with quill fully retracted (less chance of chatter and other evils). Allows lots of room for changing tools.

I've done a lot of work on my M-D (no knee). I have a friend and an emplyer with bridgeport clones...so I know
both worlds. Having access to the "real" mills makes the M-D bearable, because I can still do the stuff it won't.

Trust me, you want a mill with a knee.

You will also want a mill with a head that can tip and tilt...if for no other reason than to allow you to tram the head EXACTLY square to the table.

And you are going to want the biggest D+++n mill you can possibly affore/find room for. Bigger machines are MUCH less fussy, and unless you are a watchmaker, they are almost never a liability compared to a smaller machine.

champkrt1
04-26-2005, 08:40 PM
So its pretty well established that the HF stuff is not that great. So how about the equiptment from Grizzly? Do you think for the price, the Grizzly Mill I mentioned in the post above is a decent buy since it has a knee to it and all?

Thanks in advance for any help and advice, trying to make the best and smartest purchase I can.

Eddie

PTV
06-20-2005, 06:44 PM
Hi guy's
You've got your bearings backward.
cone bearings will take a side load, more so then a ball bearing.

Look at your cars front wheel bearings, cone, to take the side loads.

I had one of those mill/drill machines. I biggest complaint was the tool holder was a taper fit in the spindle, and would work loose under moderate side loads. If yours has a thru bolt like a bridgeport then you should be OK.
Just my 2c

Actually, GM used ball bearings in the front of their cars and light trucks up through the early 60's.
John

jlrussell4
06-20-2005, 07:39 PM
Actually, GM used ball bearings in the front of their cars and light trucks up through the early 60's.





And I changed a lot of them because they failed regularly http://206.125.208.236/forum/images/icons/icon13.gif
Jim

Jeff Parker
06-21-2005, 08:14 AM
I have a 13" LeBlonde Lathe
3 jaw chuck
4 jaw chuck
face plate w/ dogs
Steady Rest
Aloris tool rest w/ boring bars, knurling, cut off, 2 bit holders
misc tooling
220v SINGLE PHASE


9x42 Bridgeport Round Ram J head
6" grizzley vice
90* angle plate
Quite a bit of tooling, full set of collets, fly cutter set, 2/4 flute carbide cutters,counterbores, etc.
220v THREE phase, but I will include a static converter to run off single phase.

Located in Central Square NY (North of Syracuse by 20 minutes)
Please PM me, or email me at Greenblud1@aol.com for pricing

The most important thing about machine tools you NEED to know.
Tooling can well exceed the cost of the machine!!! Ask me how I know!

FXRocket
08-25-2005, 09:21 PM
I have an older multi machine (Shoptask) that gets me by for basic work where it can... But, if I were looking to replace it with a mill I would not get a round colum mill... I like dovetails, and a knee would really do it for me...
FWIW