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427fab
11-27-2004, 08:18 PM
DOES ANY BODY KNOW IF THE HARBOR FRIEGHT DISC/BELT SANDER IS COMPATIBLE FOR USE WITH STEEL.IT IS THE 9"/6" TYPE IT SELL FOR ABOUT $200.00.I AM trying to make pne from an old belt type disc/belt sander but the belt on the motor that i use slips.sometimes the motor binds.it dose not want to spin.i used a 1750 rpm motor with a 2"in pulley on both ends .Any suggestions

Boogiemanz1
11-27-2004, 08:35 PM
Hello (insert name here) welcome to Metalmeet. Glad to hear from new members.

I don't have any first hand info on the Harbor Freight belt sander. As far as the one you described, I would see if it has a bearing bad or or something in a bind. On my sander, I have a much smaller pulley on the motor than the one turning the belt/disc. This may be your problem, you are trying to turn it too fast and it lacks power....try changing the driven pulley to a larger size......hope this helps................john

Kerry Pinkerton
11-27-2004, 08:39 PM
Hi Fab (we prefer a real name, it's friendlier :D ),

I have one. It's pretty useless. Best I can figure, Chinese horses are about the size of a Cocker Spaniel. This would explain why it's so easy to bog down. You can stall it completly with fairly light pressure. Also the RPM is slow, about 1/3 what the old heavy duty US made belt 6x24 belt sander I got later. It might work OK on wood but on steel it just won't cut it.

Their belts are pretty bad also. From a design standpoint, the on/off switch is on the back side which means you have to reach around behind the spinning belt to shut it off.

If you haven't guessed by now, I'm underwhelmed.

Regarding pulley size. I don't know the RPM on the HF unit but the motor pulley is about 2" and the other pulley is closer to 6" which really shows the reduction in belt RPM. On the other hand, the US made sander has about a 8" pulley on the motor and a 4" pulley on the belt. It will really throw sparks!

427fab
11-27-2004, 08:51 PM
so what you are saying HF is crap.What about thier 12" disc sander is that any good.I dont want spend time and energy no less money trying to get this thing to work.A smaller pulley on the motor and a bigger one on the machine.Is that correct formula.It is a one horsepower motor.like the one off of a compressor.Thank Guys.Name is louie.

Kerry Pinkerton
11-27-2004, 09:17 PM
so what you are saying HF is crap.What about thier 12" disc sander is that any good.I dont want spend time and energy no less money trying to get this thing to work.A smaller pulley on the motor and a bigger one on the machine.Is that correct formula.It is a one horsepower motor.like the one off of a compressor.Thank Guys.Name is louie.

HI Louie, What I'm saying is that it doesn't work very well for me. I wouldn't buy another. The motor is too weak and the RPMs on the belt too low to grind steel. You could probably upgrade the motor but you can find a used US made older unit and be way ahead. At least I'm much happier with the old unit I got for about $250.

Pulley ratios drive the belt speed. My US made sander turns at LEAST 3-4 times faster than the HF unit.

Generally speaking, the newer HF things I've bought have had pretty sad motors. I've had a HF 6x9 bandsaw for 20 years and it is one more cutting sob. So much so, that I decided a few months back to buy another. Looks pretty much identical to the old model, just a few upgrades. Within 3 weeks I had taken three machines back because the motors burned out, sometimes within 5 minutes of setting it up. The last one, I didn't even put the legs on it, just plugged it in and let it run on the floor. Six minutes, 27 seconds later, there was a pop, puff of smoke and it was done. I just got my money back and told the manager I'd wait for them to get a new batch. She said that problems were not that frequent with their saws but that they DID seem to run in batches.

I've no experience with the 12" sander but given the weight of the unit and the size of the motor, I'd suspect it would be weak. The good thing is they are good on returns. The only issue for me is that it is a 1/2 hour one way trip to trade them in.

I've discovered their extended warranty can be a pretty good thing. We do a lot of grinding and I bought a couple of their 9" grinders. They weight about 1/2 what my US made grinders do and grind just as well while they work. For a while, I was getting about a month out of one. I ended up buying two so I could keep going while I waited for a reason to go into town where I would swap them out. We went through about 5 in the first 6 months and the last two have lasted for quite a while (knock on wood)

My point is that the 9" grinders were only 39 bucks and the warranty was about 10 so for 50 bucks I had a supply of effective, lightweight grinders for a year or more if we're lucky.

Did the same thing with some 4 1/2" grinders and the first batch has held up well. Haven't even got the backup out of the box and it's been 4-5 months. They grind as well as my Dewalt but do run hotter. If we used them all day long they'd probably smoke pretty fast.

jmvoigt1
11-28-2004, 06:30 PM
I have a sears 6x48 belt 9" disc sander, it's worked good for years. I have fixed the switch a few times but never needed any parts, just clean up. personally I don't even look at the HF magazine.

T301
12-07-2004, 06:34 AM
I have had 2 of the HF belt sanders - both have worked fine. They are cheap tin units - that is just what they are. I have to ignore the tinnyness and remember they are just there to make rough edges smooth. One of mine is hard to get the belt aligned on. The other works as good as my good belt sander.

Every once in a while they come on sale for $149 delivered. I do hate the switch on the back - I wired in a foot switch. I bought one for $149 to use until I found a good used "better" machine, but until the HF quits, it is good enough.

You get what you pay for - sometimes less, but rarely more.

Jack

Travis B.
12-07-2004, 07:06 PM
Louie,

I shy away from electronic/electrical type devices from H.F.
It's nothing more than a personal choice. I can be found there occasionally purchasing shop supply items. My suggestion is either save the money for a new or used U.S. made sander or have some fun designing and building your own loud and proud U.S. made tools. :)

Later,

Travis